Kellogg’s launches self-run Pringles recycling scheme as part of improved sustainability action

Kellogg’s launches self-run Pringles recycling scheme as part of improved sustainability action

26 Oct 2018 --- Kellogg’s is implementing increased sustainability throughout its UK operations with the launch of several new packaging measures, most notably, a new solution to allow people to recycle Pringles cans and the introduction of recycle-ready cereal pouches. Such measures make up part of the cereal and snack giants’ ambitions to achieve 100 percent reusable, recyclable or compostable by the end of 2025. This goal, which is being rolled out to all Kellogg’s global markets including the UK, builds on its current sustainable packaging commitment to continue to ensure 100 percent of all timber-based packaging is either recycled or certified as sustainably sourced.

Consumers in Britain will now be able to recycle their Pringles’ cans thanks to a new deal struck in the UK between the Kellogg’s owned crisp brand and recycling company, TerraCycle. From December 2018, empty Pringles cans can be sent into TerraCycle using freepost labels, with the sender rewarded with a charitable donation for each can which can be redeemed for the school, charity or non-profit of choice. The cans are then recycled and the resulting pellets used to create new products such as benches and fence posts.

A Kellogg’s spokesperson tells PackagingInsights: “Within the complex Local-Authority-based public recycling infrastructure in the UK, Pringles cans are not currently recyclable, so the Pringles and TerraCycle partnership provides a consistent nationwide solution for all of our consumers. We are also working with TerraCycle to set up public access collection points so that consumers have more opportunities to recycle their Pringles cans.”

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As of December, Pringles cans
will be recyclable via postal service

In a linked moved, Kellogg’s has launched a project to change its cereal pouches to a recycle-ready material by late 2019. This action will remove an estimated 480 tons of non-recyclable packaging from its British and European supply chains each year. This development comes on the back of work the company is undertaking with suppliers to identify packaging designs that minimize waste while ensuring the quality and safety of its foods.

“As a company with a caring legacy and a foundation of strong values, we’re committed to playing our part to safeguard the future of our planet. While most of our packaging in the UK is sustainably sourced, made from recycled materials and fully recyclable, we feel it’s our responsibility to continue to develop new creative packaging formats that answer the needs of our consumers and customers,” comments Oli Morton, Managing Director, Kellogg’s UK.

Currently, Kellogg’s primary materials used for packaging include paperboard, flexible films, composite cans and flexible plastic packaging. Consumers can check locally to see if materials are recyclable in their area, following the recycling information found on the majority of Kellogg’s packaging.

Kellogg’s highlights that it has already taken steps toward making its own facilities more sustainable. In April, the company announced the transition to compostable and paper food service products in all its factories and offices globally by end of 2018, fully removing all remaining single-use foam and plastic catering ware, plastic straws and plastic water bottles.

“Nurturing our planet is a foundational value of Kellogg,” says Steve Cahillane, Kellogg Company Chairman and CEO. “It’s imperative we are part of a solution that ensures a healthy and sustainable planet for all people around the world.”

All these actions contribute towards Kellogg’s support of U.N. SDG #12- Sustainable Consumption and Production, including 12.5, to substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse, the company states. It also helps towards Kellogg’s commitment against SDG #12.3, to halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer level, and to reduce food losses along the production and supply chains including post-harvest losses by 2030.

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