UPM Raflatac launches “world’s first” clear-on-clear label from recyclate

UPM Raflatac launches “world’s first” clear-on-clear label from recyclate

07 Dec 2018 --- Label supplier UPM Raflatac has introduced a new line of ultra-clear thin film labels made from 90 percent recycled content in the EMEIA region. The Vanish PCR labels are currently the only labels on the market to incorporate recycled content, according to Raflatac. They are designed to increase sustainability without compromising on performance and design.

Vanish PCR offers the same clarity, performance and premium no-label look as the original Vanish portfolio, but with an eco-design that provides label converters and end-users with a more sustainable choice: containing 90 percent recycled content, Vanish PCR facestocks and liners utilize recycled PET flakes collected from PET bottles and containers in the recycling process.

More and more iconic global brands are setting ambitious sustainability targets for their packaging materials. UPM Raflatac’s thin yet strong films are touted as being ideal for labeling rigid substrates in a variety of end uses, including beverage, home care and personal care applications. Vanish PCR is suitable for labeling food applications packed in glass or metal containers where functional barriers exist. The clarity and performance are equal to any standard clear-on-clear construction.

Sustainable by design

  • The new Vanish PCR has numerous sustainability benefits. According to Raflatac, these include:
  • Vanish PCR requires less virgin fossil feedstock to produce, extending that enhanced sustainability to global printers and brand owners drives clear benefits.
  • Vanish PCR products are the first globally available constructions to use post-consumer recycled (PCR) content in both the facestock and liner.
  • Like other Raflatac thin film constructions, they also provide efficiency gains with more labels per roll, fewer roll changes and packaging material reductions to help reduce overall costs.

Click to Enlarge“As the world's most sustainable labeling company, we want to offer our customers innovative solutions that promote and enable the circular economy. Vanish PCR is an excellent example of that,” says Robert Taylor, Director, Sustainability, UPM Raflatac. “Constructing clear label facestocks and liners from recycled content has never been seen in the packaging industry before. Together with our partners we can make a smarter future beyond fossils and close the circle.”

“Customers in the EMEIA region are looking for more sustainable alternatives. These alternatives must have the same excellent performance customers have come to expect from UPM Raflatac,” adds Jan Hasselblatt, Director, Global Business Development, Home and Personal Care, UPM Raflatac. “With our new Vanish PCR clear thin film labels you can meet – or even exceed – your sustainability targets while also achieving a premium no-label look for your containers.”

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